When The Magic Wears Off: A J.K. Rowling & Harry Potter Post

This is not a rant. This will be concise and to the point.

Since June, a Twitter storm swirled around J.K. Rowling for her tweets regarding transgender issues. Three months later, the storm is nearing Category 5. I won’t detail the timeline of this storm, but here is a link to the tip of the iceberg. You can decide if you want to dig deeper.

So what is the point of this post? The point is, I followed the Twitter storm.

The Harry Potter books are more than just books to me. They are the reason I started writing, since they inspired me to write my first fanfiction about 15 years ago. The Patronus Charm from the books got me through many nights with my inner dementors. So, I read all the tweets, I read J.K. Rowling’s lengthy blog post defending her stance, I read the criticism, and I struggled to separate the creator from the creation, the nostalgia from the reality, the fangirl from the human being.

This is where I stand: I am and always will be a Ravenclaw…but I am also an ally of transgender people, a firm believer that their lives and stories matter too. I will not support someone who hurts transgender lives, but I don’t know if I can give up Harry Potter.

To my fellow Harry Potter fans, to the LGBTQ+ community: I’m asking for guidance. Can we truly separate Harry Potter from his creator? Is it okay to refuse to buy J.K. Rowling’s future projects, but still buy fanmade Harry Potter merchandise? Is it okay to continue cosplaying as a Ravenclaw or to continue wearing my Harry Potter T-shirts? How do I share my love of Harry Potter without hurting or triggering others?

I end this post with a quote from the Harry Potter books, one I hope J.K. Rowling will remember she wrote, once upon a time.

“It is our choices, Harry, that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities.”

~ Albus Dumbledore, Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets

10 thoughts on “When The Magic Wears Off: A J.K. Rowling & Harry Potter Post

  1. I think it’s honestly still too early in the war to see how it will go. Any answer you get will still be a little raw. For now, I’d keep it on the DL because the hurt is so new. Later you’ll be able to tell if HP fandom is ok or not. My advice? Don’t let it be personal shame that makes you stop cosplay, but if you must quit, do it with love. Do it like the Kon Mari method – thank it for the joy it’s given you.

    Personally, I think it’d be a shame to throw the baby out with the bathwater.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I agree, it’s best to keep the HP love on the DL for now and see how this storm blows out (or doesn’t). I’m definitely okay with reining in the HP talk for now and instead shouting support for trans lives and the LGBTQ community as a whole. Thank you for that Kon Mari method advice in addressing the cosplay question! I do love the Kon Mari method, and I will mull over how to move forward.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. I’m not judging other people’s choices on this but I know I can’t separate the two things. I was a big fan but personally I won’t choose to do anything that puts money in her pocket or support things that may positively raise her profile. I can’t let go of the simple fact that she has a tremendous platform and she’s aggressively using it in a way that is harmful to people that are already at too much risk. 💙

    Liked by 1 person

    • I too am simultaneously devastated and infuriated at the fact that JKR has a tremendous platform and yet she’s using it in a way to harm instead of help! It’s perfectly understandable that you can’t separate the two things. I’ve been struggling myself. I hope the LGBTQ community knows we stand by them, if nothing else 💜

      Liked by 1 person

  3. This is a great question that I have been wondering about myself. I agree with Tina. I think we can separate the art from the author (I’ve done so with music), but to play devil’s advocate, sometimes the art, in a way, embodies who the artist is…I would also like to hear from those in the LGBTQ community who grew up on Harry Potter. Reading those books and watching the movies played a considerable role in my childhood, and it would be tough to completely let it go. I’ve read news about Rowling’s future projects and personally choose not to support her any further than Harry Potter.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I completely understand that the art in a way does embody who the artist is. As someone who is an aspiring writer, I can see how every poem I write, every fiction piece, they all have a little something of myself, whether its my beliefs, my perspective of life, my personal likes and dislikes, and so on. Arguably, it is impossible to create art without making it personal to the artist in some way.

      I too have personally chosen not to support J.K. Rowling’s future books and other projects. It’s my love of Harry Potter that I’m trying to figure out how to balance 😦

      Thank you for sharing your thoughts on this!

      Like

  4. I think we can. When I was still on Twitter, I read a number of comments from those in the LGBTQ2 community who were crushed by her words. I think that those are the ones we need to support. The fact that the actors themselves have spoken out against her views helps. I would like to also hear from those in the LGBTQ2 community as well.

    Liked by 2 people

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